John McBride
January 6, 2014
Photos By: Chris Lacour

Once Evolution and Jon Lund finished up, I had an hour and a half drive home, which gave me a chance to see how my Mustang would act both on the highway, as well as in sticky traffic conditions. I've also had about a week to drive it around town to and from work a few times before writing this article.

The cams are pretty aggressive, but driveability is still good. Lund did a fantastic job tuning—the car makes smooth power and doesn't stall out. The power doesn't feel like it drops off at all on its way up to 6,800 rpm, and the car launches hard with the mods and 4.10 gears.

Lund did a fantastic job tuning, so the car makes smooth power and doesn't stall out.

Although my focus for this '06 GT is straightening out the corners, I'm anxious to get it to the dragstrip to see what kind of times my hot-rod Mustang will pull down.

The combination of my current muffler-delete axle-backs, the cams, and the Kooks exhaust components belts out serious exhaust notes. The Three-Valve feels a lot more responsive, and I can feel the extra horsepower and torque it's laying down.

11. The install is straightforward. Starting with the water pump pulley, remove the four bolts and stock pulley and replace with the new one. To get to the harmonic balancer you may need to remove the front sway bar and electric fan and shroud for clearance. Then remove bolt and harmonic balancer. The instructions recommend reusing the factory torque-to-yield harmonic balancer bolt, but to be safe, we used a new replacement bolt kit from ARP (PN 156-2501). Make sure to apply ARP ultra-torque fastener assembly lubricant to the bolt threads as instructed. Install washer and bolt hand tight then tighten to 100 lb-ft. Replace sway bar and fan assembly.
12. Before putting on the intake manifold, the fuel line hose is fed through each side underneath the intake manifold. The alternator support bracket also needed to have the holes enlarged to 0.25-inch and the ear bent down for clearance. Next, place the intake manifold onto the engine and tighten down the bolts to 89 in-lb.
13. Lastly, replace the fuel rails, injectors, connectors, evaporative system hose, and breather hose to the driver side of the intake manifold.
14. The Ford Racing 62mm twin-bore throttle body will help flow more air than the stock unit, plus it looks awesome. The throttle body bolts right onto the front of the intake manifold with four bolts, reattach connectors.
15. The Ford Racing cold-air intake will flow more air than our stock unit and has OEM quality and fit. First the airbox is bolted into place using the included hardware. Once secured into place, we then transferred the mass air meter from our stock airbox inlet tube to the new Ford Racing unit. Lastly, install the air intake tube from the airbox to the throttle body and tighten the hose clamps.
16. Now it’s time to install the Kook’s long-tube headers and high-flow catted X-style mid-pipe. Since we had access to a lift, Chuck went the route of dropping the K-member to complete the header installation. Although this isn’t the only way, this was the easiest and quickest way. Before dropping the K-member, make sure the engine is supported. The steering rack will also need to be disconnected and moved out of the way. Next, remove the motor mounts, starter, and disconnect O2 sensors. Next unbolt and remove the engine oil dipstick, factory header bolts, headers, studs, and stock catted mid-pipe.
17. Kooks supplies all hardware and gaskets with its long-tube headers. Chuck recommended using the stock header gaskets since they were in good shape. He installed the headers using new hardware.
18. Comparing the stock headers and catted X-style mid-pipe to the new Kooks equipment, you can really see the difference it’s going to make, in power as well as sound!
19. Before tightening down the driver-side header, install the dipstick assembly, and then tighten the header bolts.
20. Once the header installation is completed on both sides, the motor mounts, starter, steering rack, and K-member can be bolted back up. Then connect the front O2 sensors to the Kook’s headers.
21. The Kooks catted X-style mid-pipe is loosely bolted onto the ends of the headers and the rear exhaust pipes then adjusted for fit. Make sure all O2 sensors are tightened down and back in place.
22. Now for the moment of truth. Jon Lund of Lund Racing met us at Evolution Performance to dial in the new mods for performance and driveability on the ’06 Mustang GT. Our stock baseline tune with 4.10 gears was good for 255 hp and 270 lb-ft of torque to the rear wheels.
Lund performed an initial test run to make sure systems checked out and then made three full passes on the dyno, working his magic to optimize the tune. It ended up making 331 hp and 299 lb-ft of torque. That’s an increase of 76 horsepower and 29 lb-ft of torque to the rear tires above the baseline figures. I was hoping for slightly higher numbers—don’t we all?—but Lund said the 4.10 gear ratio will drop the horsepower number down about 15-20. Also considering I had larger tires and that the air quality wasn’t the best that day, my Mustang was laying down good numbers. He’s seen Mustangs with similar mods, stock wheels, and a 3.31 or 3.55 gears putting down 365-370 rwhp.
Lund performed an initial test run to make sure systems checked out and then made three full passes on the dyno, working his magic to optimize the tune. It ended up making 331 hp and 299 lb-ft of torque. That’s an increase of 76 horsepower and 29 lb-ft of torque to the rear tires above the baseline figures. I was hoping for slightly higher numbers—don’t we all?—but Lund said the 4.10 gear ratio will drop the horsepower number down about 15-20. Also considering I had larger tires and that the air quality wasn’t the best that day, my Mustang was laying down good numbers. He’s seen Mustangs with similar mods, stock wheels, and a 3.31 or 3.55 gears putting down 365-370 rwhp.